The Buzzing Bee

Surprise! I know we said every other Thursday, but we couldn’t wait that long. We sincerely hope you enjoyed our first post, and learned something new and exciting in the process. Thank you to those who provided feedback, it is very much appreciated. Keep it coming! Our goal is to continue to develop a platform designed to present an array of experiences and adventures to support an active lifestyle and a mindful outlook. With that, we want to say our intention is to provide suggestions, and potentially uproot new experiences as a result. The experiences and adventures discussed are ones we stumbled upon, and thought, “hey that was pretty darn fun, glad we gave it a go”. Furthermore, an open mind can take you places you never thought possible, and may change your way of thinking and perspective on life.

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Waterfall at the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon

On that note, we recently attended a hot yoga class. The studio we went to practices a style known as hot vinyasa flow yoga. This means that the practice contains many poses that flow into one another, usually cued by breath. As newcomers to the class, we arrived early and began to settle into our mats and awaited the cue to begin our first pose. However, instead of the expected downward dog cue, the instructor asked us to find a comfortable, rested, and seated position. Once the class seemed to find ease in their positions she began to explain the sound of the month known as, Bhramari, also referred to as, Humming Bee Breathing. Now bear with us as we are new yogis, and do not know enough to teach by any means. Beside the fact, we are excited to share our discovery of a new term and practice. For both of us, it is a practice we are going to implement as we continue on our journey.

The full name for the practice is Bhramari Pranayama, where Pranayama is the formal practice of controlling the breath. There are many ways to practice controlling the breath and Bhramari is just one of them. Bhramari is known as the Humming Bee Breath because when you exhale you make a humming sound, almost like the sound a bee makes as it buzzes by your ear. When practicing you want to feel the buzzing sound in your mouth and head.

You may be wondering, why and what is the purpose of this practice? We are delighted you asked. The buzzing sound you make as you exhale is designed to create static in your head which acts to clear your mind and settle your thoughts. From experience, we know life gets busy, and it may be difficult to control the distractions around you. Therefore, Humming Bee Breathing can help block the “noise”, aiding to focus on what is important to you in order to journey through life with a clear mind.

At the end of this post we have included a link to a website which provides more detail on how to perform this practice at home. In the link it also talks about a hand position, which goes with the sound, known as a mudra.

We both found this practice fitting to ourselves, but also to the time of the year. We are now in the month of June, and next week we will be celebrating Summer Solstice. A new season, Summer, is right around the corner, which means new adventures await. We found that this practice may help us with keeping our minds open as we welcome new adventures and opportunities so that we may make the most of them all.

Let the humming begin!

Over and out,

Luke and Alison

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Bridge at the Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

 

 

Links:

https://www.artofliving.org/yoga/breathing-techniques/bhramari-pranayama

https://tiffanywoodyoga.com/blog/tip-of-the-month-how-to-practice-bhramari-pranayama-bee-breath-1

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